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The Greater Berlin we know today marks its 100th anniversary in 2020. The Architekten- und Ingenieurverein zu Berlin e.V. has taken the initiative with an pioneering project.
The Greater Berlin we know today marks its 100th anniversary in 2020. The Architekten- und Ingenieurverein zu Berlin e.V. has taken the initiative with an pioneering project.

Occasion & initiative

01

Shaping
Visions

The Greater Berlin we know today marks its 100th anniversary in 2020. That date offers a timely opportunity to review the city’s strengths and weaknesses and consider what is required for a sustainable future. The Architekten- und Ingenieurverein zu Berlin e.V. has taken the initiative with an anniversary programme that asks the relevant questions and puts proposals from policymakers, civil society actors, and experts up for discussion. Three formats supply the setting: Urban Planning Network colloquia, an International Urban Design Ideas Competition for Berlin-Brandenburg 2070 and a major exhibition entitled 100 Years of (Greater) Berlin: An Uncompleted Project.

Shaping
Visions

The Greater Berlin we know today marks its 100th anniversary in 2020. That date offers a timely opportunity to review the city’s strengths and weaknesses and consider what is required for a sustainable future. The Architekten- und Ingenieurverein zu Berlin e.V. has taken the initiative with an anniversary programme that asks the relevant questions and puts proposals from policymakers, civil society actors, and experts up for discussion. Three formats supply the setting: Urban Planning Network colloquia, an International Urban Design Ideas Competition for Berlin-Brandenburg 2070 and a major exhibition entitled 100 Years of (Greater) Berlin: An Uncompleted Project.

Exhibition

02

October –
December 2020

Over the past 100 years, this metropolis has changed and reinvented itself under a variety of influences. This development will be dealt with in an exhibition project under the themes: Diversity of Centers, Housing Issues, Traffic Issues, Green Issues, Major Projects, Planning Culture and exhibiting in the Kronprinzenpalais in Berlin-Mitte. The results of the „International Urban Design Competition Berlin-Brandenburg 2070“ will also be presented to the public during the exhibition. Another focus of the exhibition project will be the view of Europe in our twin cities of Moscow, Vienna, Paris and London.

Over the course of history, (Greater) Berlin has accumulated a multitude of centres: major centres like Berlin Mitte, City West, and Potsdam Mitte as well as medium-sized, small and very small centres – real and symbolic, permanent and temporary, centres for the entire region or the whole city, but also centres of districts, neighbourhoods, and housing complexes. And of course the surrounding municipalities have centres of their own. 

(Greater) Berlin’s characteristic housing map with its working class, middle class, and upper class districts is above all a product of the private-sector construction boom of the 1890s to 1910s. A long period of state-regulated housing policy after 1920 led to the emergence of a complex social housing landscape.

(Greater) Berlin was created by mass rail transport, but held the preconditions for car-driven urbanism. Over the course of time, a ring/radial system emerged, with arterial roads and rail lines radiating out through the concentric inner and outer rail and motorway rings. 

A century ago the Greater Berlin Competition of 1908 to 1910 came to a clear conclusion: the rapidly growing city needed belts and wedges of green space for structure and quality of life. In a first important step, the forestry agreement of 1915 reserved huge swathes of forest for recreation and sport. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, large new parks were created within the city and regional parks planned outside it.

Major plans pave the way of the metropolis. The prelude was the competition Groß-Berlin 1908-1910. This was followed by the often contradictory plans in the Weimar Republic, during the Nazi era and in divided Berlin. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, state development plans emerged. All these big plans served very different purposes – the mobilization of attention, the obligation of public authorities, the orientation of private investors.

From the outset, large-scale facilities have shaped and even weighted the metropolis: industrial areas, military training areas, harbors, science cities, hospital facilities. After 1920, the Westhafen, Tempelhof Airport and the Exhibition Center followed. After the fall of the wall, the system of the airports was reorganized as the distribution of goods. In all these questions, Berlin and Brandenburg are completely interdependent.

For at least 100 years, politicians and experts have been working to forge suitable structures and instruments for the growing Berlin region. The creation of the Greater Berlin authority was without doubt the most important political decision in this respect. Ever since, the relationship between the city and its boroughs has been on the agenda, along with the question of coordination between the states of Berlin and Brandenburg and the creation of relevant agencies, resources, and plans.

In 1920, Berlin was not even half a century of Germany’s capital – not popular everywhere, especially not appreciated everywhere. The role of (big) Berlin as the capital of the young Weimar Republic was not clearly regulated in 1920. Nevertheless, the central state played a key role in the further development of the metropolis. Even today, federal projects shape the image of the metropolitan region – not always to the delight of the locals.

The metropolis is more than Berlin! That was already clear in 1920. The closer and wider environment of Berlin is enriched by emerging locations with historical roots, but which do not always receive the attention they deserve. This is especially true, but not only for the mother city of Berlin: Brandenburg an der Havel. Many cities and towns in Brandenburg have long since become part of the metropolis, their design shapes our common future.

Around 1900, a broad-based European trend emerged to reform the governance, administration, and planning of major cities that had outgrown their established boundaries. This turned out to be a very difficult process, obstructed by rigid, irreconcilable conflicts of interests, and was rarely successful. Besides Berlin, four other European cities are examined more closely: Moscow, Vienna, Paris, and London. 

Over the course of history, (Greater) Berlin has accumulated a multitude of centres: major centres like Berlin Mitte, City West, and Potsdam Mitte as well as medium-sized, small and very small centres – real and symbolic, permanent and temporary, centres for the entire region or the whole city, but also centres of districts, neighbourhoods, and housing complexes. And of course the surrounding municipalities have centres of their own. 

(Greater) Berlin’s characteristic housing map with its working class, middle class, and upper class districts is above all a product of the private-sector construction boom of the 1890s to 1910s. A long period of state-regulated housing policy after 1920 led to the emergence of a complex social housing landscape.

(Greater) Berlin was created by mass rail transport, but held the preconditions for car-driven urbanism. Over the course of time, a ring/radial system emerged, with arterial roads and rail lines radiating out through the concentric inner and outer rail and motorway rings. 

A century ago the Greater Berlin Competition of 1908 to 1910 came to a clear conclusion: the rapidly growing city needed belts and wedges of green space for structure and quality of life. In a first important step, the forestry agreement of 1915 reserved huge swathes of forest for recreation and sport. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, large new parks were created within the city and regional parks planned outside it.

Major plans pave the way of the metropolis. The prelude was the competition Groß-Berlin 1908-1910. This was followed by the often contradictory plans in the Weimar Republic, during the Nazi era and in divided Berlin. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, state development plans emerged. All these big plans served very different purposes – the mobilization of attention, the obligation of public authorities, the orientation of private investors.

From the outset, large-scale facilities have shaped and even weighted the metropolis: industrial areas, military training areas, harbors, science cities, hospital facilities. After 1920, the Westhafen, Tempelhof Airport and the Exhibition Center followed. After the fall of the wall, the system of the airports was reorganized as the distribution of goods. In all these questions, Berlin and Brandenburg are completely interdependent.

For at least 100 years, politicians and experts have been working to forge suitable structures and instruments for the growing Berlin region. The creation of the Greater Berlin authority was without doubt the most important political decision in this respect. Ever since, the relationship between the city and its boroughs has been on the agenda, along with the question of coordination between the states of Berlin and Brandenburg and the creation of relevant agencies, resources, and plans.

In 1920, Berlin was not even half a century of Germany’s capital – not popular everywhere, especially not appreciated everywhere. The role of (big) Berlin as the capital of the young Weimar Republic was not clearly regulated in 1920. Nevertheless, the central state played a key role in the further development of the metropolis. Even today, federal projects shape the image of the metropolitan region – not always to the delight of the locals.

The metropolis is more than Berlin! That was already clear in 1920. The closer and wider environment of Berlin is enriched by emerging locations with historical roots, but which do not always receive the attention they deserve. This is especially true, but not only for the mother city of Berlin: Brandenburg an der Havel. Many cities and towns in Brandenburg have long since become part of the metropolis, their design shapes our common future.

Around 1900, a broad-based European trend emerged to reform the governance, administration, and planning of major cities that had outgrown their established boundaries. This turned out to be a very difficult process, obstructed by rigid, irreconcilable conflicts of interests, and was rarely successful. Besides Berlin, four other European cities are examined more closely: Moscow, Vienna, Paris, and London. 

• International Urban Design Ideas Competition

03

End 2019 /
Beginning 2020

In Juli 2019, will Berlin 2020 gGmbh launch the anonymous two-phase International Urban Design Ideas Competition for Berlin-Brandenburg 2070. The main goal of the „International Urban Planning Ideas Competition Berlin-Brandenburg 2070“ is not to discuss a completely different, new metropolitan region next to or on the surface of the existing, but the further development of the existing metropolitan region. With a basically excellent transport network, many centers of different rank, an above-average housing stock and a comparatively undeveloped surrounding area, the metropolitan region has ideal future conditions that must be recognized, cultivated and further developed.

1. Phase

2. Phase

The subject of the first phase is the development of an overall plan of the competition area with guiding ideas and images for the spatial development of the Berlin-Brandenburg metropolitan region on a scale of 1: 100.000 as well as an urbanistic representation of an exemplary subspace in the year 2070, which represents the conception and the conception of the author of the future Metropolis meaningfully represented. The subspace to be displayed is freely selectable within the entire competition area. From the submitted works of the first phase, the jury selects up to 20 office teams to deepen their contributions in the second phase.

2. Phase

In the second phase, the main focus is on the deepening of structural development contexts within the framework of an overall plan in M ​​1: 100,000 as well as proposals for three specific sub-areas, which can be chosen freely within the scope of ten main topics. For each well two slides are to be created. Within the main topics, three sub-areas have to be selected. Of the three selected sub-areas, at least one must be in Brandenburg and one in Berlin. Eligible to participate are architects, city planners in collaboration with landscape architects who create interdisciplinary teams. The whole process is anonymous until completion.

End 2019 / Beginning 2020

In Juli 2019, will Berlin 2020 gGmbh launch the anonymous two-phase International Urban Design Ideas Competition for Berlin-Brandenburg 2070. The main goal of the „International Urban Planning Ideas Competition Berlin-Brandenburg 2070“ is not to discuss a completely different, new metropolitan region next to or on the surface of the existing, but the further development of the existing metropolitan region. With a basically excellent transport network, many centers of different rank, an above-average housing stock and a comparatively undeveloped surrounding area, the metropolitan region has ideal future conditions that must be recognized, cultivated and further developed.

1. Phase

The subject of the first phase is the development of an overall plan of the competition area with guiding ideas and images for the spatial development of the Berlin-Brandenburg metropolitan region on a scale of 1: 100.000 as well as an urbanistic representation of an exemplary subspace in the year 2070, which represents the conception and the conception of the author of the future Metropolis meaningfully represented. The subspace to be displayed is freely selectable within the entire competition area. From the submitted works of the first phase, the jury selects up to 20 office teams to deepen their contributions in the second phase. Aus den eingereichten Arbeiten der Ersten Phase werden durch das Preisgericht bis zu 20 Büro-Teams ausgewählt, die ihre Beiträge in der Zweiten Phase vertiefen sollen.

2. Phase

In the second phase, the main focus is on the deepening of structural development contexts within the framework of an overall plan in M ​​1: 100,000 as well as proposals for three specific sub-areas, which can be chosen freely within the scope of ten main topics. For each well two slides are to be created. Within the main topics, three sub-areas have to be selected. Of the three selected sub-areas, at least one must be in Brandenburg and one in Berlin. Eligible to participate are architects, city planners in collaboration with landscape architects who create interdisciplinary teams. The whole process is anonymous until completion. Teilnahmeberechtigt sind Architekten, Stadtplaner in Zusammenarbeit mit Landschaftsarchitekten. Das gesamte Verfahren ist bis zum Abschluss anonym.

Urban Planning Network colloquia

04

October –
December 2020

Accompanying the exhibition, six Urban Planning Network colloquia will supply an interdisciplinary review of urban planning developments in the Berlin region and offer a forum for discussion and debate. The colloquia will bring in civil society actors in Berlin and the region, above all from the sectors of mobility, construction, health, digitalisation, and energy, as well as relevant cultural actors. The results of the “ International Urban Design Ideas Competition for Berlin-Brandenburg 2070″ will also be discussed in order to discuss strategies for further action.

Mobility in the metropolitan region is on the cusp of transition. What does the future hold? The goal is to integrate the different forms of mobility, permitting fluid changing between inter-city rail, rapid transit, tram, bus, car-sharing, bicycle and walking. Isolated visions and concepts exist for all these means of transport: the question is how to integrate and optimise them in the existing urban context.

Many of the region’s settlements and quarters offer spaces of social and functional diversity. But work contexts and lifestyles are always changing, as are external circumstances such as the natural and social climate. How can existing settings be improved? And how can new developments be made more flexible and resilient?

Berlin possesses huge swathes of forest and impressive parks, while Brandenburg offers wonderful natural and recreational landscapes as well as the famous Prussian palaces and gardens. Berlin is also an Olympic city, known for its numerous superb sports venues. And Berlin is a centre of healthcare, too. What can urban planning contribute to promoting these strengths?

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time. Action is needed to restrict temperature rise, but also to cope with inevitable changes. Berlin has committed to climate neutrality by 2050, as has Potsdam. What instruments will be required to meet those targets? What will that mean for the energy supply? What will be the impacts on the metropolitan region? On architecture and planning?

Berlin’s culture scene is legendary. The region is a microcosm of European history: Nazi capital, Cold War frontline, and beating heart of German reunification. Berlin is also a major centre of learning. What does the past mean for the future? How should science and culture be fostered? And how can a climate of tolerance be secured?

The region has always been a productive “test-bed of modernity”. Digitalisation is already transforming our daily lives – but how? And how can the change best be channelled? How can the actors of digitalisation be promoted? And above all, how can developments in individual sectors – housing, work, research, mobility, energy supply, retail – be digitally networked? 

Mobility in the metropolitan region is on the cusp of transition. What does the future hold? The goal is to integrate the different forms of mobility, permitting fluid changing between inter-city rail, rapid transit, tram, bus, car-sharing, bicycle and walking. Isolated visions and concepts exist for all these means of transport: the question is how to integrate and optimise them in the existing urban context.

Many of the region’s settlements and quarters offer spaces of social and functional diversity. But work contexts and lifestyles are always changing, as are external circumstances such as the natural and social climate. How can existing settings be improved? And how can new developments be made more flexible and resilient?

Berlin possesses huge swathes of forest and impressive parks, while Brandenburg offers wonderful natural and recreational landscapes as well as the famous Prussian palaces and gardens. Berlin is also an Olympic city, known for its numerous superb sports venues. And Berlin is a centre of healthcare, too. What can urban planning contribute to promoting these strengths?

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges of our time. Action is needed to restrict temperature rise, but also to cope with inevitable changes. Berlin has committed to climate neutrality by 2050, as has Potsdam. What instruments will be required to meet those targets? What will that mean for the energy supply? What will be the impacts on the metropolitan region? On architecture and planning?

Berlin’s culture scene is legendary. The region is a microcosm of European history: Nazi capital, Cold War frontline, and beating heart of German reunification. Berlin is also a major centre of learning. What does the past mean for the future? How should science and culture be fostered? And how can a climate of tolerance be secured?

The region has always been a productive “test-bed of modernity”. Digitalisation is already transforming our daily lives – but how? And how can the change best be channelled? How can the actors of digitalisation be promoted? And above all, how can developments in individual sectors – housing, work, research, mobility, energy supply, retail – be digitally networked? 

Partners

05

Sponsors / Supporters

Contact / Imprint

Adress

Berlin 2020 gGmbH
c/o AIV zu Berlin e.V.
Bleibtreustraße 33
10707 Berlin

T +49 30 8 83 45 98
F +49 30 8 85 45 83

mail@bb2020.de

Donation account

Berlin 2020 gGmbH
IBAN DE 2510 0900 0027 2513 3009
Berliner Volksbank

Impressum
 
Patron: The Governing Mayor of Berlin
 
Berlin 2020 gGmbH on behalf of AIV Architekten- und Ingenieur-Verein zu Berlin e.V. together with the
Architekturmuseum der TU Berlin
 
Director of Architekturmuseum TU Berlin
Dr. Hans-Dieter Nägelke
 
Managing board of AIV President
Dipl.-Ing. Tobias Nöfer
 
2. President 
Dr.-Ing. Melanie Semmer
 
Treasurer
Dipl.-Ing. Sonja Berghaus
 
Secretary
Dipl. Bauing. ETH Nicole Zahner
 
General Manager Berlin 2020 gGmbH
Dr. Benedikt Goebel
Dipl.-Ing. Tobias Nöfer
 
Project Leader
Patrick Zamojski, M.Sc.
 
Curators of the Exhibition
Prof. Dr. Harald Bodenschatz
Dipl.-Ing. Christina Gräwe, Co-Kuratorin
Dr. Benedikt Goebel, Co-Kurator
Prof. Dr. h.c. Wolfgang Schuster
 
Art-Direction, Design & Development 
STUDIO 10–4

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